Article XI, Section 1 of the NJ Constitution provides:
3. All law, statutory and otherwise, all rules and regulations of administrative bodies and all rules of courts in force at the time this Constitution or any Article thereof takes effect shall remain in full force until they expire or are superseded, altered or repealed by this Constitution or otherwise.

IN THE MATTER OF APPLICATION OF XIANGJING ZHAN TO CHANGE NAME OF HONGHONG ZHAN, NJ:Appellate Div. 2012 provides:
The common law allows name changes without judicial approval and without a public record of the change. Absent a criminal or fraudulent purpose, an adult can "legally and properly change his or her name at will and without need of judicial approval simply by using the desired name in ordinary life." Matter of Bacharach, 344 N.J. Super. 126, 130 (App. Div. 2001). The name change statute provides a more formal means to adopt a new name and "provides a definitive and swift procedure for public recordation." Id. at 130-31.[1] However, the statute is to be construed in light of the common law and does not abrogate it. Id. at 131; Egner v. Egner, 133 N.J. Super. 403, 406 (App. Div. 1975); Application of Lawrence, 133 N.J. Super. 408, 411 (App. Div. 1975).

Affidavit